Red Pony Essay

Red Pony Essay-84
Billy Buck, the ranch hand, must inform Jody that the spot of blood is the sign of fertilization that the rooster has left behind.It's interesting to note that Steinbeck does not have Jody's mother or his stern father report this fact to Jody.

Billy Buck, the ranch hand, must inform Jody that the spot of blood is the sign of fertilization that the rooster has left behind.It's interesting to note that Steinbeck does not have Jody's mother or his stern father report this fact to Jody.

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The four stories connect most evidently in the character of Jody and the fact that two of the stories involves horses and two involve the passing of members of the older generation is significant in ways that may not be immediately apparent from the loose structure.

Essentially, is a standard coming-of-age story about young boy learning the hard lessons necessary to mature into a young man.

He is disturbed by the buzzards, but he understands that, ugly as they may be, they rid the land of carrion.

Death brings life to the buzzards, and the buzzards, in turn, rid the land of contamination.

The events that are about to unfold will teach him those very lessons, and they will mark the first steps toward adulthood.

Slowly but surely, Steinbeck hints at a sense of revolt stirring inside of Jody, another of the initial signs that a child is beginning to move away from his parents, moving toward independence.Jody is old enough to understand this on a rational level.He has yet to experience loss and death on an emotional level.So despite Jody's conscious innocence, something is stirring inside of him, something that senses the changes that are about to take place that will push him into that world of men.In the meantime, however, Jody is patient and so in awe of his father that, even though he wants to go along, he does not even ask permission to accompany them.The first mention of this occurs as Jody smashes a muskmelon with his heel. He knows it is wrong, and he tries to hide the evidence by burying the cracked melon.However, just a couple of paragraphs later, Steinbeck mentions that Jody was feeling "a spirit of revolt" once he joined his friends at school.To further insinuate the transition that Jody is about to experience, Steinbeck then has Jody climb up the hill and look back at the ranch from an elevated position, where "he felt an uncertainty in the air, a feeling of change and of loss and of the gain of new and unfamiliar things." At this same point in the story, Steinbeck brings in the image of two buzzards, which signal death.Although Jody may be unfamiliar with some aspects of nature, he is not unaware of the cycle of life and death.Later on, the reader will discover that Billy is the one person most responsible for Jody's rite of passage.Steinbeck, at this initial stage, is foreshadowing these circumstances.

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