Oppression Essay

Oppression Essay-25
Composer Katarzyna Głowicka’s music responds to this perfectly: it is designed to express the monotony of oppression and the explosive moments of revolt.The sounds of the string quartet and live electronics interact through unsettling contradiction, playing out the story of abuse and vulnerability.Their writings add to this famous theme a ban-breaking element, reaching from a place of a complete exclusion for an ‘immortal’ means of expression like poetry.

Composer Katarzyna Głowicka’s music responds to this perfectly: it is designed to express the monotony of oppression and the explosive moments of revolt.The sounds of the string quartet and live electronics interact through unsettling contradiction, playing out the story of abuse and vulnerability.Their writings add to this famous theme a ban-breaking element, reaching from a place of a complete exclusion for an ‘immortal’ means of expression like poetry.

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The Western opera tradition chose love as its vital theme and has primarily focused on relations between the sexes.

Thereby, it has shown great creativity in constructing models for Western intimacy and its understanding.

Unknown, because un-understood, is both a form of exclusion silencing women and the power of expression between women that the poem reveals. / Let me write my last poem.” Writing, threatened by the ultimate punishment, becomes the ultimate gesture of resistance, as well as a provocative message to and for other women.

“Damn you God (…) / For building a wall in front of my will” marks how contradictions in a traditionally elevated religious order – understood as a repressive political programme – cruelly demotes women. Roya’s poems are accompanied by harrowing works by Freshta.

It creates a sense of solidarity and, at the same time, an awareness that every broadening of freedom creates necessities for new responsibilities and new strategies of resistance.

“Unknown, / I learn from you / the language of love / you learned from your mother,” writes Roya.Most of all, it is the germ of a project for a new world, a world which gives back active power to women’s desires.Even though the act of writing could send them to their deaths (today’s regime is less radical, but the situation of women improves very slowly), the poems by the Afghan poets inscribe themselves powerfully within the well-known Western Horatian topos “non omnis moriar” (“I shall not wholly die”).Her performance brings an overwhelming sense of despair but also a peculiar tenacity.Californian singer and transgender woman, Lucia Lucas offers a rare and brilliant bass-baritone that intertwines with falsetto in a vital dialogue between a victim and executioner, bringing the disturbing effect of a disjointed and broken narrative.In this context, The Airport Society collective’s founder Krystian Lada’s decision to take the extraordinary texts written by contemporary Afghan female poets – under a pseudonym and in a politically restricted situation – and adapt them into an opera seems extremely strong.Lada – a director, librettist, dramaturg, and music activist – repeatedly insists that correcting historic operas is not his aim.However, when studied carefully, it simultaneously forms this intimacy’s most significant criticism.No opera heroine sings an affirmation of her positive experience.In this sense, popular Western opera librettos represent various acts of sexual repression.Great opera heroines like Carmen, Medea, Turandot or Mimi feed our imagination.

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