Essay About Health Care Access

Essay About Health Care Access-7
This issue is obviously important to all Americans, but it is of vastly greater importance to those who, because of disability or age, find themselves more dependent on medical care than the average American.The truth of the matter is that the disabled and elderly stand to benefit most from a good medical care system.

This issue is obviously important to all Americans, but it is of vastly greater importance to those who, because of disability or age, find themselves more dependent on medical care than the average American.The truth of the matter is that the disabled and elderly stand to benefit most from a good medical care system.

Before we discuss possible solutions, let’s make sure that we understand the problems and their causes. There would certainly be little or no wait to see a doctor, and prices for an office visit would drop considerably.

I have identified six factors that contribute substantially to the escalating cost of America’s health care. The increased supply creates better availability and reduced prices.

The following article was originally published in early 1994.

At the time that he wrote this article, Mike Winther was the Executive Director of the Society for Handicapped, a Modesto, California-based charity.

The debate over health care in America is now front-page news almost every day.

Everyone seems to agree that there is something wrong with the system and that something should be done—but what should we do?After all, a doctor’s incorrect diagnosis harms only one patient, but a misdiagnosis of our nation’s health care system could devastate the health of ten’s of millions. Imagine for a minute what would happen if we convinced one-half of America’s doctors to retire.As I watch the health care debate, one of my greatest concerns is that there is very little emphasis on identifying the causes of the problem. This instant shortage of doctors would result in long waits, and those doctors remaining in practice would raise their rates significantly.But the truth of the matter is that there is no oversupply of health care providers; in fact, just the opposite is true. An article appearing in the July 27th issue of the Washington Times stated that, “U. physicians fresh out of their residencies are being riddled with job offers.” The article continues, “Two-thirds of young doctors receive at least 50 job offers during their residencies and almost 50 percent receive more than 100.” The U. has approximately 120 medical schools that each average about 100 admissions a year. Some medical schools will have over 10,000 applications this year.Unfortunately, many of our best and brightest students will never make it into medical school. Davis Medical School admitted 100 students each year; they now admit 93.Instead of increasing medical school enrollment, some medical schools have actually reduced the number of annual admissions. As our population has grown larger and older, our supply of trained doctors, nurses, and other professionals has not kept up with the increased demand.It should come as no surprise that health care costs are rising.The idea of increasing the number of doctors, nurses, etc.is a sensitive issue with medical professionals who don’t want to see the standards of their profession compromised—or to see their profession flooded with additional competition. physicians reinforces what local doctors tell me: they are working very long hours, they are seeing more patients than ever before, and they still cannot keep up with demand. Davis Medical School, with 93 positions, has over 5,000 applicants each year.Conversely, it is the disabled and elderly who will suffer the most from a bad system.In this series of articles, we will attempt to go past the political game-playing and look at the real causes and solutions of our health care woes.

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