Being Unprepared Essay

Being Unprepared Essay-18
After asking to see lesson plans for the sections in which English graduate students taught undergraduate composition, Fish found that in almost every section, “students spent much of their time discussing novels, movies, TV shows and essays on a variety of hot-button issues — racism, sexism, immigration, globalization.”Of the 104 sections, only four emphasized grammar, rhetoric, and the craft of writing well.

After asking to see lesson plans for the sections in which English graduate students taught undergraduate composition, Fish found that in almost every section, “students spent much of their time discussing novels, movies, TV shows and essays on a variety of hot-button issues — racism, sexism, immigration, globalization.”Of the 104 sections, only four emphasized grammar, rhetoric, and the craft of writing well.

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But despite the difficulty of comparison, many states have strikingly high remediation rates in their public colleges and universities. At many public schools in the state, it’s uncommon for an incoming student to be placed in remedial education.

At Baltimore City Community College, for instance, in the fall of 2015, only 13 percent of students were deemed ready to start on college-level math and English courses right away, according to data provided by the school.

Most schools place students in what are called remedial courses in math or English before they can move on to a full load of college-level, credit-bearing courses – a process that is a financial drain on not only students, but also colleges and taxpayers, costing up to an estimated $7 billion a year.

Data from 911 two- and four-year colleges revealed that 96 percent of schools enrolled students who required remediation in the 2014-15 academic year, the most comprehensive recent numbers.

Nearly 40 percent of students at two-year schools and a quarter of those at four-year schools failed to complete their remedial classes, that report found.

Different states use different cutoff scores to determine who must take these classes, which makes remediation-rate comparisons difficult and, critics say, remedial placement somewhat arbitrary.And regardless of the discipline—whether English, history, biology, or art—they expect students to write at a higher level than they did in high school.Are incoming students unprepared for college writing?And 40 percent of those who took the ACT writing exam in the high school class of 2016 lacked the reading and writing skills necessary to complete successfully a college-level English composition class.According to The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on education, “only 13 percent of [Baltimore City College] students were deemed ready to start on college-level math and English courses right away.”As a result, many students must attend remedial classes, “a process that is a financial drain on not only students, but also colleges and taxpayers, costing up to an estimated billion a year.” Most Colleges Enroll Many Students Who Aren’t Prepared for Higher Education, January 2017The article quotes Sonja Brookins Santelises, chief executive officer of Baltimore City Public Schools, who puts the onus on those who are supposed to be preparing these teens for a college future.Some states also did not provide specific student enrollment numbers at all, did not report it for all their schools or did not have data from that year available.(Read more about the problems we had collecting this data here.) Related: Many who pass state high school graduation tests show up to college unprepared The rates are “so high that there’s no question students are getting out of high school without the skills they need to succeed in college,” said Alex Mayer, a senior research associate at MRDC, an education and social policy research organization.We hear again and again that many freshmen lack the most basic skills to write clearly, effectively, and coherently because their working knowledge of grammar, punctuation, spelling, and paragraph structure is so poor.The Why Kids Can’t Write article reveals that Three-quarters of both 12th and 8th graders lack proficiency in writing, according to the most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress.A while back, I talked about the importance of strong writing skills in the workplace.Today I want to take a look at the grim statistics regarding poor writing skills on college campuses and help you explore things you can do “The Snapchat generation may produce more writing than any group of teenagers before it, writing copious text messages and social media posts, but when it comes to the formal writing expected at school and work, they struggle with the mechanics of simple sentences.” Why Kids Can’t Write (NY Times, August 2017)First-time college students face their new post-high school careers with excitement, fear, and any number of challenges.

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